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Chapel Lane, Wigan

26 Comments

Old Presbyterian Chapel of 1769 shown on Old Wigan Map 1840’s to 50’s
Photo: Keith
Views: 926
Item #: 33398
A map of Wigan from 1840’s or 50’s, showing the exact location of the old Presbyterian Chapel in Chapel Lane. Ron Hunt published an early photo recently of it and a number enquired as to its exact whereabouts.

Comment by: Cyril on 2nd November 2021 at 15:04

Interesting to see how Harrowgate was then spelled, now spelled without the w as in Harrogate Street, another gate to add to the list of Wigan gates perhaps. Also looks to be a park alongside Warrington Lane and a fish pond on the corner of what is now Darlington St.

Comment by: Veronica on 2nd November 2021 at 15:31

I read somewhere that Archery was practiced in Hardybutts. Perhaps they did the same in Harrowgate. (arrow).

Comment by: Elizabeth on 2nd November 2021 at 16:23

Yes Veronica,I have heard that arrows were shot from Scholes,hence the name Longshoot.

Comment by: Veronica on 2nd November 2021 at 17:20

You can imagine all the
'Yokels' learning to defend their localities against the enemy or invaders from other areas! Bit like Dad's Army Elizabeth!

Comment by: Cyril on 2nd November 2021 at 17:27

There's also Rope Walk between King St and Millgate, which is probably still there and now an alley between King St and Library St, and was this before the railway was built, a continuation from Wilgoose Lane which was also known as Rope Walk, maybe it had once been an ancient rope traders path into and out of town. There was a Ropemakers Arms on Caroline St so possibly there was a ropemakers business around there.

Comment by: Veronica on 2nd November 2021 at 17:52

If only we could get a trip up to go back to those times around Wigan . - We would probably get lost! It would be fascinating - as long as we could come back though.

Comment by: Roy on 2nd November 2021 at 19:47

Cyril, where there's a Rope Walk there was a rope making works, the rope walk was where they laid out their long lengths of twine before twisting it together to become a rope.

Comment by: Roy on 2nd November 2021 at 19:53

Cyril, Wilgoose Lane and the Rope Walk were discussed on the 5th October's P-a-D.

Comment by: Donald Underwood on 2nd November 2021 at 20:14

Elizabeth.I always understood that Longshoot gained its name from the Civil War,when Cromwellian artillery shot at the Royalist stronghold at the Parish Church

Comment by: Josh on 2nd November 2021 at 20:22

The map shows Gas Works and in 1822, Roman Cremation Urns were uncovered during the construction of the gas-works, suggesting the existence of a Roman Cemetery.

Comment by: Elizabeth on 2nd November 2021 at 20:35

Yes,it may be called Longshoot from that time.(Civil War)

Comment by: Veronica on 2nd November 2021 at 20:36

I wonder what happened with the Urns. Were they re buried Josh?

Comment by: MikeW on 3rd November 2021 at 10:51

Did someone in this group once proclaim there were no old coal pits in the town centre area?

Comment by: Albert.S. on 3rd November 2021 at 12:14

I can see Sovereign Mill, is Sovereign Road still where it always was?.

Comment by: Veronica on 3rd November 2021 at 13:18

I notice a coal pit in Hardybutts at the top of what became Cambridge St. Also Lowes Square is near where my grandfather was born in Clockface Yard leading off Lowes Square in 1881. Surprisingly the maisonettes where we lived for a couple of years was named Lowe's House. The names never seem to die in that area. I wonder if John St exits on the map a little further to the right. Thanks for posting this Keith.

Comment by: Cyril on 3rd November 2021 at 15:49

Veronica, the archaeological reports in the two links below are interesting to read through. They both mention that there was evidence of a roman cemetery being near to where Darlington St is now, though they don't reveal what happened to the burial urns found when work began on the gas works. Maybe they like the bathhouse remains found on Millgate were taken by a museum in Manchester.

https://eprints.oxfordarchaeology.com/4954/1/Darlington%20Street%20Archaeological%20Watching%20Brief%20Report.pdf

https://oxfordarchaeology.com/images/pdfs/GMPR/GMPR03_Wigan.pdf

Comment by: Veronica on 3rd November 2021 at 18:19

I looked at the 40 page one Cyril. Not managed the Gas Works Cemetery yet. You can see from the maps why they would settle at the 'top' of Wigan and the Cemetery was further away to the lower right. There must still be a lot to be found of Roman life. Very strange how the Roman Baths site is practically the site of the modern baths. I remember going looking around the site in 2007. Wigan has always been very important how it's placed for travellers North and South it seems. I must try to get into the other site for the excavation of the Gasworks. Thank you Cyril for that. I always wonder why the Romans gave up in Britannia - could it have been the dreadful weather! If it was there's no surprise there!

Comment by: RON HUNT on 3rd November 2021 at 21:12

Donald, Elizabeth, the word LONGSHHOT is derived from a long narrow strip of land in the middle ages called a SHOOT Nothing to do with firing a canon ball aimed at the Parish Church its a misconception.

Comment by: Anthony on 4th November 2021 at 03:37

You are correct regarding Longshoot, Ron.
The name was used as early as the 1320s, when King Edward II visited the district, and presided over court hearings relating to local disputes.

Comment by: Keith on 4th November 2021 at 09:37

Cyril, thank you for those links, both were interesting, particularly the second one.

Comment by: Ben on 4th November 2021 at 09:43

If it had been Edward ll’s father who had visited it would have been case of Longshanks at Longshhot.

Comment by: Terry on 4th November 2021 at 11:15

Cyril. Harrogate Street took its name from the Harrogate Well, which stood where the Premier Inn is now, and the name isn't a variation of Arrow Gate.
The well was named after the spa town of Harrogate, as water from it supposedly had similar health giving properties to the Harrogate water
There was a building adjoining the well where invalids could take the water.
Industrial pollution In the early 19th century led to the contamination of the well and its closure,

Comment by: Terry on 4th November 2021 at 12:57

Apologies to Cyril. My comment abiceregarding the name of Harrogate St is in fact for Veronica's information.

Comment by: Donald Undewood on 4th November 2021 at 13:24

Oh! The deceptions practised upon me in my infancy

Comment by: Veronica on 4th November 2021 at 13:32

Yes I saw that afterwards Terry.. in the report that Cyril recommended. I don't think it would have Health giving properties these days..;~)

Comment by: Cyril on 4th November 2021 at 15:32

Terry, I had read of that well with its iron mineral rich water and probably a reason the romans had billets in Wigan, as they favoured places that had a supply of this particular type of water to boost their intake of iron.

If anyone is inquisitive to how this iron mineral rich water tastes then Spatone of Conwy have sachets of it available at health food shops, though do have a spittoon to hand as it's an acquired taste.

I'd never seen it spelled as Harrowgate with a w before Terry, always spelled like you say the same as the town in Yorkshire.

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