wiganworld home page
Home Photos of Wigan Stuff News What's on Classifieds Forum Communicate Guestbook Links
 Search    In association with  The Wigan Courier
 Stuff
  Thomas Woodcock VC
  Ancient and Loyal
  Booklets
  Wigan facts
  Famous Wiganers
  Interviews
  Timeline
  Wigan dialect
  Wigan speyk!
  Oddities
  Black & White
  Local art
  Local poetry
  Contributions
  Requests
  Memories
  I remember...
  My collection
  Pubs of the Past
  Wigan quizzes
  Picture quizzes
  Jigsaws
  Jigsaws II
  Wigan Cemetery Index
  Gidlow Cemetery Index
  Hindley Cemetery Index
  Ince Cemetery Index
  Westwood Cemetery Index
  Howe Bridge Cemetery Index
  Roll of Honour
  Reading Room
  Reading Room 2
  Spitfire Crash
  Street History
  Wigan Streets, 1890
  Wigan Streets, 1903
  Wigan Streets, 1909
  Wigan Streets, 1933
  Wigan Yards
  On this day in...
  Chronology
  Court Leet Rolls
  Documented
  Ephemera
  Wigan Past
  Wigan Crest
  Old news
  1825 Directory
  1869 Directory
  1881 Directory
  Hindley Directory
  Ince Directory
  Upholland residents
  1889 Yearbook
  Wigan Views, 1908
  Old Borough Guide
  Picture Post, 1939
  Recipes, 1925
  Your Letters
  Diverted
 
 
Old news detailing sports, crime, violence and suffering in Victorian Wigan. All stories taken from The Wigan Observer And District Advertiser, 1890. Material kindly loaned by Ron Hunt.


Saturday, September 13, 1890.

DETERMINED SUICIDE AT HAIGH.
   On Tuesday, George Benson, a gatekeeper, aged 72 years, living at Seneca-lane, Haigh, committed suicide in a most determined manner. The old man had been in a low state for some time, and had not attended to his work until a few days ago. His son, who resides with him, saw him with a razor in his hand, and heard him threaten to take his life away. He took the razor from his father and made him promise not to do such a thing. About a quarter to twelve in the morning deceased left the house, and in a few minutes his son followed, and found him with his throat cut and the razor covered with blood lying besides him. Dr. Cooke, of Aspull, was immediately sent for, but Benson died before his arrival.
   On Friday morning, Mr. Brighouse, county coroner, held an inquest at the Crawford Arms, Red Rock. The first witness was William Benson, the son of the deceased, who lived in Seneca-lane, who said his father was a gate-minder at the level-crossing belonging to the Wigan Coal and Iron Company. He was 71 years of age. Witness, who lived with him, knew that his mother found him with a case of razors in his coat pocket a fortnight ago on Thursday. He would not say why he had them there. For many weeks deceased had not been well, and was low-spirited, and thinking that he might do something to himself they had to watch him. Dr. Cooke had also attended him. On Tuesday morning deceased left the house, and after going into the back garden he was followed by his grand-daughter, a little girl. The deceased brought her back to the house, and then went into the front garden. Sometime afterwards witness went to look for him, and found him with his throat cut, and a razor besides him. Death occurred about half-an-hour afterwards in the house, before the arrival of Dr. Cooke. The deceased had been in apprehension for some time of having to move from the house he occupied, which might cause him to leave his present employment, as he could not walk very far. Even a note that Mr. Fair, of the estate office, would not satisfy him. On Saturday when witness came home from his work, his father said to him that he had broken open the case of razors, but he had got over the feeling and had put them back.
   Police-constable Doherty, stationed at Haigh, said he picked a razor up from the garden all covered with blood, and saw the deceased, who had a wound in his throat.
   The Jury informed the coroner that there was no more respected man in all the township than the deceased.
   A verdict of "Suicide whilst temporarily insane" was returned.



Wednesday, September 17, 1890.

ALLEGED DASTARDLY OUTRAGE
AT ASPULL.

   The Bolton county magistrates were on Monday engaged several hours investigating a shocking charge of criminal assault. An old woman of 62, named Elizabeth Smith, stated that she was coming through the fields from Aspull to Hindley on the afternoon of the 9th inst., and had sat down to rest when a man named Richard Judge, after accosting her, seized her by the throat and attempted to assault her. She got up and ran some distance, but he overtook her, and then committed the assault complained of. - The prisoner was defended by Mr. J. Hall, borough public prosecutor, who spoke disparagingly of the prosecutrix, and took occasion to animadvert on the alleged bias imported into the case by the police. - The Chairman of the bench (Mr. W. Slater) rebuked the advocate, and said the police-sergeant gave his evidence with perfect fairness. They committed Judge for trial at the Manchester Assizes, refusing bail. - On the decision being announced there was a demonstration in court against the prosecutrix, who was threatened with violence. The magistrates directed that the woman, together with the other witnesses for the prosecution, should have police protection. A large crowd of excited inhabitants of Aspull assembled outside the court, but peace was maintained.



Wednesday, September 17, 1890.

AN ORRELL LANDLORD'S DIFFICULTIES.
   Henry Finch, landlord of the Abbey Lakes Hotel, Orrell, was summoned to show cause why he had not complied with a magistrates' order that was made upon him to pay his water rate, £2 19s. 6d., and his general district rate, £3 15s. 6d. - Defendant said he was not in a position to pay. He was already under the sheriff. It was for spite more than anything else that he had been summoned. - Mr. Lamb: The question is whether these rates are due. - Defendant said he had been summoned for all three rates at one time. - Mr. Henry Gorse (clerk to the Orrell Local Board) said all the rates were due. - Defendant: How many persons in Upholland have paid their rates? - Mr. Gorse: I don't know, I have nothing to do with Upholland. - The Defendant: In Orrell? - Mr. Gorse: Nearly all the rate-payers. If I had not summoned you the rates would have been lost. - Defendant: Not a bit of it. You know I am already in a lawsuit with the owners of the hotel. - Mr. Gorse: The furniture in the house does not belong to you. - Defendant: Yes, it does - at least a large portion of it. - Mr. Gorse: Well, how is the distress warrant returned marked "No effects." - Defendant: Have you not been offered a certain sum to prosecute me? - Mr. Gorse: Certainly not. - Defendant: They only want to get me out of the house. - Mr. Lamb: You will have to pay those rates or else you will be sent to gaol. - Defendant: How long will you give me? - Mr. Lamb: You will have to pay the money in a week, or else you will have to be committed to gaol for fourteen days on each summons.



Wednesday, September 17, 1890.

POACHERS FINED.
   William Paddington and John Grundy, of Billinge Chapel-End, were charged with poaching on the Garswood estate at Billinge. - Police-constable Hodson saw the men on the 28th ult., and they dropped their nets, which contained rabbits, and ran away. A fine of 20s. and costs was imposed.



Wednesday, September 17, 1890.

DEFICIENT WEIGHTS.
   At the Ormskirk Petty Sessions, John Watts, fruiterer, Wigan, was charged with having certain unjust weights in his possession on the 31st July. - Mr. Jervis said that on the date named the defendant was in the Ormskirk Market, selling fruit, when he found in his possession a 1 lb. weight 2qrs. light, and a ½ lb. weight ½qr. light and unstamped. - He was fined 1s. and costs. - Peter Bannister, fruiterer, Wigan, was fined 10s. and costs for a similar offence at Ormskirk, on the 31st July. - Mr. Jervis said he found in possession of the defendant an 8oz. weight 1½qrs. light and unstamped, a 4oz. weight 1½qrs. light and unstamped.



Wednesday, September 17, 1890.

SUNDAY MORNING AT INCE.
   Two young men named Wm. Presho and David Marsh were charged with being drunk and disorderly at Ince. - The statement made by Police-constable Roberts was that about half-past twelve on Sunday morning along with two others the prisoners were drunk and disorderly in Manchester-road, Ince. They were using filthy language and were accordingly cautioned several times, but the officer's advice was always received with a defiant answer, and they dared him to take them to the Police-station. Presho was then taken into custody, and then the other young men began to kick up a disturbance and attempt to rescue him. Bricks, stones, and bottles were thrown, and it was with the greatest difficulty that he was taken to the station. Marsh, who was misbehaving himself, was told that if he came to the office he would be locked up, persisted in following them, and was at last taken into custody and locked up. They were afterwards bailed out. - A fine of 2s. 6d. and costs was imposed.



Wednesday, September 17, 1890.

AN IMPUDENT YOUNG THIEF.
   Thomas Wilkinson, 12 years of age, was charged with stealing one leather hat box, one silk singlet, one chest preserver, two ties, four handkerchiefs, and several letters from a railway carriage in Turner's siding, near Spring-gardens, on the London and North-Western Railway. - It appears that the lad climbed up the embankment and searched among the empty coaches standing in the siding. The articles in question had been left in one of the carriages by a passenger, and he took them. Formal evidence was given, and the case was adjourned till Thursday. - Alice Wilkinson, mother of the prisoner, was charged with receiving the goods knowing them to have been stolen, but the case against her was also adjourned till Thursday.



Wednesday, September 17, 1890.

ROUGH ON THE POLICEMEN.
   John Rooney, 24, Vauxhall-road, was charged with assaulting Police-constable Brookes whilst in the execution of his duty. - The constable said that while he was on duty in Scholes on Friday night he was called to the prisoner's home in order to protect Mrs. Rooney. He and Police-constable Laird entered the house, whereupon the prisoner rushed at witness's legs and threw him down. He then rushed to the fire-place and threw a large pan of hot water over Laird, after which he threw a teapot at witness. - The prisoner: Gentlemen, if you will let me off I will sign teetotal. - Mr. Roocroft: The police must be protected. You will have to go to prison for a month.



Wednesday, September 17, 1890.

AN IMPROPER SALE OF COAL.
   Charles Gibson, of Watmough's-yard, was charged with unlawfully selling coal by bucket instead of by weight. - The Town Clerk (Mr. A. Smith) who prosecuted, said that Inspector Grime had cautioned defendant several times. - Defendant said he had only recently come out of the workhouse, and his sons had bought him a donkey and cart. He was a cripple and had been unable to procure scales until last week. - He was ordered to pay 2s. 6d. towards the costs.


 Reading Room:
  Page 1
  Page 2
  Page 3
  Page 4
  Page 5
  Page 6
  Page 7
  Page 8
  Page 9
  Page 10
  Page 11
  Page 12
  Page 13
  Page 14
  Page 15
  Page 16
  Page 17
  Page 18
  Page 19
  Page 20
  Page 21
  Page 22
  Page 23
  Page 24
  Page 25
  Page 26
  Page 27
[top]
 
 © 2018 wiganworld
Click here to read the privacy policy, disclaimer and copyright information.
Please contact us with your ideas, suggestions, moans or questions.