wiganworld home page
Home Photos of Wigan Stuff News What's on Classifieds Forum Communicate Guestbook Links
 Search    In association with  The Wigan Courier
 Stuff
  Thomas Woodcock VC
  Ancient and Loyal
  Booklets
  Wigan facts
  Famous Wiganers
  Interviews
  Timeline
  Wigan dialect
  Wigan speyk!
  Oddities
  Black & White
  Local art
  Local poetry
  Contributions
  Requests
  Memories
  I remember...
  My collection
  Pubs of the Past
  Wigan quizzes
  Picture quizzes
  Jigsaws
  Jigsaws II
  Wigan Cemetery Index
  Gidlow Cemetery Index
  Hindley Cemetery Index
  Ince Cemetery Index
  Westwood Cemetery Index
  Howe Bridge Cemetery Index
  Roll of Honour
  Reading Room
  Reading Room 2
  Spitfire Crash
  Street History
  Wigan Streets, 1890
  Wigan Streets, 1903
  Wigan Streets, 1909
  Wigan Streets, 1933
  Wigan Yards
  On this day in...
  Chronology
  Court Leet Rolls
  Documented
  Ephemera
  Wigan Past
  Wigan Crest
  Old news
  1825 Directory
  1869 Directory
  1881 Directory
  Hindley Directory
  Ince Directory
  Upholland residents
  1889 Yearbook
  Wigan Views, 1908
  Old Borough Guide
  Picture Post, 1939
  Recipes, 1925
  Your Letters
  Diverted
 
 
Old news detailing sports, crime, violence and suffering in Victorian Wigan. All stories taken from The Wigan Observer And District Advertiser, 1890. Material kindly loaned by Ron Hunt.


Friday, December 26, 1890.

EXCITING SCENE IN KING STREET.
   About eleven o'clock on Wednesday morning a carrier's cart was proceeding along the town end of Darlington-street towards Ince, the tram being directly behind it. One of the women in the cart evidently thinking the engine was going to jolt against the cart foolishly jumped out to avoid the collision she expected. It was, however, a case of "jumping out of the frying pan into the fire," for she fell directly in front of the engine, the driver of which only succeeded in bringing it to a standstill when all the horrified bystanders expected the poor woman would be run over. As it was she escaped with a dislocated shoulder and a severe shaking, and we learn that she is recovering quickly from the effects of these.



Friday, December 26, 1890.

FATAL SCALDING CASE AT HINDLEY.
   A little boy, named John Horkin, aged 2 years, son of Michael and Margaret Horkin, of 15, Lodge-street, Hindley, died on Wednesday morning from injuries received the previous day. It appears Mrs. Horkin was washing on Tuesday, and on the fire was a large pan containing hot water, which she had occasion to lift on to the floor. The baby in the cradle commencing to cry, she turned to attend to it, leaving the boy near the fire. On hearing a scream, Mrs. Horkin looked round and found the deceased sitting in the pan of hot water. The little fellow was badly scalded, and Drs. Aspinall and Cromwell were called in, but their efforts were of no avail.



Friday, December 26, 1890.

SHOCKING FATALITY TO A
SIGNALMAN AT BRYN.

   On Wednesday afternoon, at the Infirmary Mr. Cronshaw, deputy borough coroner, held an inquest touching the death of William James Rafferty, a signalman, living at Bryn, who was fatally injured by a locomotive engine on Friday, and afterwards died at the Infirmary.
   Thomas Davidson, Wigan-road, Bryn, said deceased was his cousin, and lived in the same road. Deceased was a married man, and 40 years of age, and was a signalman in the employ of the London and North-Western Railway Company. On Sunday witness saw him at the Infirmary, but he was insensible. Witness had previously seen deceased, and he said it was a strange thing that both brothers should die the same death. He told witness he was going home on a brake-van on Friday morning, and when he jumped off a bank engine came along, and caught him. Deceased did not blame anyone.
   Wm. Lawrence, 297, Warrington-road, Lower Ince, foreman shunter under the L. and N.-W. Railway, said he was in the brake van that deceased got on at Garswood Hall. Deceased rode with him to the other side of Bryn Junction and witness said "the signal here is right for passing, but the distant signal is against us." He further said to the deceased that they had better clear the crossings before they got off, so that there would be no danger. A hundred and fifty yards past the junction deceased stepped off the van into the six-foot, and was crossing the up main line when the bank engine came along and knocked him down. Witness was following the deceased and saw it all happen. He went to him at once and saw that the right leg was smashed, and that he was lying on the right-hand side of the up line. Assistance was procured, and after witness had put a tourniquet above the knee deceased was carried to Bryn Station. He was taken to the Infirmary in the ambulance. The accident happened about half-past six in the morning and it was rather foggy.
   Dr. Birkenhead said deceased was admitted to the infirmary on Tuesday morning, at a quarter to eight, suffering from smash of the right leg below the knee, and a broken left leg. He was in a very bad state in consequence of the injuries, and he died at six o'clock on Sunday night.
   A verdict of "Accidental death" was returned.



Wednesday, December 31, 1890.

ALLEGED THEFT OF FISH.
   At the Wigan County Police Court, on Friday, before Messrs. J. C. Eckersley and J. Gaskell, three respectably dressed young men named Thomas Leonard, John Heyes, and John Thomas Marsh, all of Hindley, were charged with stealing a codfish, the property of Joseph Bishop, fish dealer, Market-street, Hindley. - Police-constable Guthrie said that about half-past two on the morning of the 26th ult. he was on duty at the back of prosecutor's premises, and saw the three prisoners tying up a codfish in a handkerchief. When they saw witness they all ran away, leaving the handkerchief and fish on the ground. Later on in the evening he arrested the three prisoners. - Each of the prisoners said that if the case was remanded they could bring witnesses to prove that they were not about the place at all at that time. - A remand was granted.



Wednesday, December 31, 1890.

ROW IN A BEERHOUSE.
   At the Chorley Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, John Harrison was summoned for assaulting Thomas Holcroft. - Mr. Berry appeared for complainant, who said he was in the St. Patrick beerhouse, Standish, on the 13th inst., when defendant asked him if he was going to get a summons to make him give up a club-book connected with a club, and he followed this up by saying he would give him something to go for. A fight between two other men ensued, during which while complainant was on a form, defendant came behind and kicked him and also struck him on the head. - Defendant said complainant provoked him by saying that he had "clammed" his first wife, and was in the road to "clam" another. He only got hold of complainant by the coat collar. - Fined 10s. and costs.



Wednesday, December 31, 1890.

HIS CHRISTMAS RESIDENCE.
   William Yates, of no settled residence, was brought up on remand charged with stealing several head of poultry from the Round House Farm. It will be remembered that several months ago a man named Ashurst was convicted and sentenced to two months' imprisonment in connection with the same offence, and he then stated that a man named Yates was the real thief. Since then the police have kept a watch for Yates, who is a well-known character, and he was arrested a week ago. - The Chief-constable (Captain Bell) stated that the case would not be proceeded with, as Ashurst declined to come forward and give evidence against Yates, and had even said that he stole the poultry himself. - Mr. Roocroft: Where have you been living lately? - Prisoner: Well, I have been living below here this last week. (Laughter.) I have been for some time in Scholes. - Mr. Roocroft: You will be discharged.



Wednesday, December 31, 1890.

ALLEGED ROBBERY BY WOMEN.
   Two well-known characters, named Catherine Gorman and Mary Ann Tinsley were charged with stealing a calico bag containing a sovereign and seven shillings in silver from the person of William Withington on the previous day. - The Chief-constable (Captain Bell) gave his worship the facts of the case. The prosecutor in company with another man named Evans went into the Woolpack public-house about half-past ten on Monday night. The prisoners were there, and Withington paid for drinks for the lot. Then they left and went to the Waggon and Horses, where they drank some more beer at the expense of the prosecutor. As they were proceeding over Scholes Bridge Gorman put her hand into prisoner's left hand trousers pocket, and took out the bag containing the sovereign. He saw her do it, and made a grasp at the bag, but only caught the string, and in some manner it was passed over to the other woman, who ran away. Withington caught hold of Gorman and detained her until the arrival of the police. The bag was eventually found, but not the sovereign. Tinsley was apprehended at Higher Ince. - William Withington bore out Captain Bell's statement, and said he was left with 7d. in his pocket. In all 27s. was taken, although he did not know how the silver was extracted from his pocket without his knowing. - Prisoners were remanded until Thursday.



Wednesday, December 31, 1890.

THE SLIPPERY STATE OF THE STREETS.
   Owing to the very slippery state of the streets during the last week several cases of accident have been reported. Among these is that of Miss Masters, of Wigan-lane, who dislocated her shoulder whilst proceeding home from St. Michael's Church on Christmas Day; and also Mr. Hall, butter merchant, of Park View, who has injured himself with a fall.



Wednesday, December 31, 1890.

SERIOUS ACCIDENT TO A SERVANT.
   Police-constable Brooks was called to the White Horse Inn, Standishgate, about eight o'clock on Tuesday morning, and was informed by William Darbyshire, 25, Shelmerdine-street, that Elizabeth Crook, servant for Mr. Topping, the landlord of the Inn, had fallen from the top of a flight of steps at the back door. Dr. Woodcock was sent for, and he stated that the base of the skull was fractured, and ordered her removal to the Infirmary. This was done by means of the horse ambulance, and we understand that she lies in a very critical condition.


 Reading Room:
  Page 1
  Page 2
  Page 3
  Page 4
  Page 5
  Page 6
  Page 7
  Page 8
  Page 9
  Page 10
  Page 11
  Page 12
  Page 13
  Page 14
  Page 15
  Page 16
  Page 17
  Page 18
  Page 19
  Page 20
  Page 21
  Page 22
  Page 23
  Page 24
  Page 25
  Page 26
  Page 27
[top]
 
 © 2018 wiganworld
Click here to read the privacy policy, disclaimer and copyright information.
Please contact us with your ideas, suggestions, moans or questions.