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Pension age 75 in 16 years?
Started by: Dave xl5 (311)  Report abuse
A Tory think tank chaired by Iain Duncan Smith has drawn up plans to raise the state pension age to 75 over the next 16 years. Good idea? What planet do these looney tunes live on.

Posted by: tonker (19935)   Report abuse
I recently worked in a house, up Bolton way, and the bloke seemed to be a bit like me, in so much as age / fitness / frame of mind etc.. I'm 61.
When I got talking to him, I discovered he's 67, still working on regular night-shift. He's getting state pension.

Another bloke I know, in Westhoughton, is 66, getting state pension and still working. He runs the IronMan triathlons and another one, much harder, called the Brutal Triathlon, up Snowdon.


My point is, is it wrong to claim state pension and still hold full-time employment? and does this prove that 65 is not (always and in every case) an age to retire?

My wife's dad, who died 3 years ago at aged 83, was still working!

Posted by: TerryW (1751) Report abuse
Can't see a problem with it myself, Tonker, their tax will have been adjusted on the amount of pension they get, plus they won't have to to pay any national insurance contributions. They are still paying their way.

Posted by: Anne (3515)  Report abuse
I agree about fitness and health issues. I papered my last ceiling about five years ago using the two stepladders and plank method when I decided to stop on the grounds of being alone. You are the only person to know and decide when to stop.
p.s. Will be the big eight o next year.

Posted by: TerryW (1751) Report abuse
It's only a number, Anne. Ignore it and carry on as if you have just left school, it's all in the mind.

Posted by: Dave xl5 (311)  Report abuse
I must say how many people in their 60s never mind 70s would be capable of doing a full time job? I was 56 when I had to finished work through serious heath problems, I'm now an OAP and receive a good works pension, so life financially isn't too bad. But during the last few years before reaching state pension age, three times I had the decision by the DWP that I was capable of some kind of limited work overturned by tribunal, and the thought of that continuing for myself, and millions of people like me for ten more years would drive even more people to suicide. If someone is fit and capable, and enjoying working, then fine, let them carry on, my sister-in-law does a part time job at seventy, because she wants to, then that's fine too. But I know many who never even reached 65 never mind 75. I believe if you get to your 60s without medical problems of some kind, you're very lucky. Doing jobs for a short time isn't the same as a full time job. And also does anyone really believe the people who dream up these marvellous plans have any intention of working to anywhere near that age themselves?. NO! They want to be off to a £300 a pop, and a subsidised top meal and sleep on the benches of The House of Lords.

Posted by: Tommy Two Stroke (3626) Report abuse
They have done me for a year, I have got wok until I am 66 and I can't wait for it.

So this news may affect me,, the burgers might not let me retire at 66

And folk like whupsy say that I am aTory

Posted by: baker boy (14614) Report abuse
age is a number ,if you want to work fine if not ,dont.
if you want to finish work just finish .
tts its called pension credit.

Posted by: whups (3617)   Report abuse
it,s those who wont retire who,s keeping the young out of work . the whole point of retirement is to make way for the young to take over . as for the duncan-smith think tank this lot will work you into the grave as none of them has done a days work in their lives .

Posted by: broady (14701)   Report abuse
Presumably Corbyn , Prescott etc. haven’t done either or is it only Tory politicians that “ never work a day in their life” When you post after twelve are you just in from the pub?

Posted by: hugh wilson (55) Report abuse
I'm 70 and still working full time. My state pension has been deferred until whenever I decide to retire, which at the moment is looking like May 2020 at age 71, although the company I work for asked last week whether I would be prepared to continue for another 12-18 months after that date.

Interest is paid on any unclaimed state pension and there are two options:

1. Take the 6 years unclaimed pension plus interest as a lump sum and then take the basic weekly pension.

or

2. Take an enhanced weekly pension, in which the unclaimed pension with interest is paid weekly and added to the basic pension payment.

Retirement at state pension age is no longer compulsory and several of my colleagues are older than me. One of the reasons that we all keep working is that there are very few younger persons who want to work in heavy engineering - in my case shipbuilding - most of the younger generation don't want to get their hands dirty and would prefer to work in IT services.



Posted by: baker boy (14614) Report abuse
whups wrong again ,the whole point of retirement is not to give youth a chance.political mumbo jumbo.
its to give folk like myself a well earned rest after near 50 years working.the young should be strong enough to look after themselves.
if i have made a mistake in bringing up my kids ,i believe i have acted as dad the banker.instead of letting them struggle to find their feet,i paved their way to reliance on us has parents for a bail out when they over stepped their financial abilities.
i believe i am not alone in today,s modern society of making their kids less independent.

Posted by: kathpressey (4953)  Report abuse
I think politicians who come up with these ideas need to get out into the real world and do some manual labour for a few days and see how they cope.

Posted by: whups (3617)   Report abuse
your the type of man that keeps the young out of a job then BB ? .how can they look after themselves if people like you deny them the right . broady all your doing is following my posts & putting rubbish on it for the sake of it & for your information iv,e not had a drink or been to the pub for over 12 mnths.

Posted by: stacker lee (309) Report abuse
The Tories used to boast about Thatcher working 16 hour days. I used to say, "Put a spade in her hands and see how many hours she does!" I've got a soft desk job now and I'm still going to finish as soon as I can. Ian Duncan Smith would send kids up chimneys, they like their MPs hard on the working classes in Chingford!

Posted by: tonker (19935)   Report abuse
My dad sometimes worked16 hour shifts, 7 days a week, at Parkside. I used to tell him he was mad and it would finish him off. I have one of his last pay slips, over £800. Not bad for 1985. Not bad for 2019!
He had a heart attack, at the pit, which put the frickeners on him and he retired early, at 60.
He managed 5 months in retirement then died of a heart attack. Moral of the story? Don’t retire, as work keeps you goin’???

Posted by: jarvo (29245)  Report abuse
I'm off to Molineux tonight using my season ticket that cost £290. Not bad, 19 PL games at just over 15 quid a game.

I've had to wait over 50 years to get it.

I think I deserve it - 50 years in engineering and 50 years paying tax and insurance.

But I am still too young for a Wiggin bus pass!



Come on you Wolves!

Posted by: Handsomeminer (1535) Report abuse
Been saving 12p a week

Posted by: tonker (19935)   Report abuse
Wigan Athletic would be cheaper AND closer to home. Think of the saving you'd make on travelling!

Posted by: baker boy (14614) Report abuse
whups i retired well before i had too,nearly 50 years was enough.i had a part time job when i was thirteen.

Posted by: beep54 (1012) Report abuse
Good Luck jarvo, Enjoy

Posted by: Tommy Two Stroke (3626) Report abuse
baker boy

"i retired well before i had too"

That was because Rathbones closed down

That pension credit thing was a temporary thing brought in whilst they upped the women's retirement age up to 65 which was done over a five-year period, now yoo are only entitled to pension credit, when you are of state pension age

Posted by: Tommy Two Stroke (3626) Report abuse
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-48882195

Posted by: whups (3617)   Report abuse
what about the other entitlements 1stroke ? . no bus pass till your 65 for women ? .

Posted by: Tommy Two Stroke (3626) Report abuse
Whupsy

Tha's reet, no bus pass for me until I am on't pension at 66

Posted by: whups (3617)   Report abuse
why would you need one anyway 1stroke when you can ride around wigan in your tax free taxi ? .

Posted by: whups (3617)   Report abuse
just another money making scheme from the tory henchman iain duncan-smith , the man who gave us the bedroom tax & universal credit . quite a lot of people wont reach 75 & those who do wont be claiming it for very long after.

Posted by: broady (14701)   Report abuse
The current leader of the Labour Party is 70. If he were to be elected PM next time around and served the full term he would be 75+ at the end of it. Is he not keeping a young guy out of a job or does he agree with IDS?

Posted by: gaffer (6108)   Report abuse
With controversial subjects cabinet ministers and politicians have only two choices, ignore it and leave if for the next administration or take the blame for the work of the mandarins in the Treasury.
I doubt that there’s ever been a UK politician with the necessary actuarial skills and experience to formulate forward pension entitlements.
Salaries for actuaries at the top end of the profession are upwards of £200k.

Posted by: whups (3617)   Report abuse
saying your a supposed labour man broady you dont half support the tories in virtually everything they propose to stick the boot into the working public.

Posted by: broady (14701)   Report abuse
You contradict yourself. You say folk should retire at 65 to enable jobs for the young but are quite happy to put a 70 year old into a job of mega importance. I was an NHS baby. Brought up on powdered milk, orange juice etc. I think it is a great institution but it badly needs overhauling. I did 56 years under the system. I have now done over 13 under another system all FOC and there are things that could be learned from it but you totally reject change. I think that most politicians are a waste of time, what ever the party, but you only condemn one party. If Labour politicians are so good why are they not in power?

Posted by: whups (3617)   Report abuse
stop talking rubbish broady you know what i said . all you do is look for my replies & try your best to muddy the waters . the reason why were not in power is because we cant get labour people out to vote . i will always condemn a tory government because of the way it treats the working class of our country & the policies it contrives like universal credit which has cost lives .you by your rhetoric subscribe to that thought .and considering your not in this country anymore why do you even open your mouth & before you say it , no your not entitled to your opinion anymore.and for your information the tories are now robbing some of labours policies.

Posted by: broady (14701)   Report abuse
OK. As ever you are 100% correct. Maybe Labour voters don't go out to vote because there is no Labour Party as we knew it. By the way I still am entitled to vote. Anyway much better things to do today. Will clock in to see your midnight postings.

Posted by: Tommy Two Stroke (3626) Report abuse
Does Jeremy Corbyn pay any tax

Posted by: broady (14701)   Report abuse
Can anyone define this oft mentioned working class. If one of us has a major operation involving doctors, nurses etc. are they not all working class? Is the Doctor excluded because he has a higher salary, drives a BMW, plays the wrong sport?? If you are unemployed or retired can you still be classed as "working class"? Can a millionaire not be Labour? The Labour party is bankrolled by millionaires. So does that mean the party of the "working class" is bankrolled by non "working class? All very confusing. Perhaps someone, who apparently understands it better than me, could explain it.

Posted by: whups (3617)   Report abuse
your trouble broady is you have a short memory . you put a reply on 1 of these blogs about me making political remarks did,nt you . well who brought the politics into this 1 , maybe you by bringing the labour leader into it . pot calling kettle comes to mind . like i said your wrong on everything.

Posted by: broady (14701)   Report abuse
All that education wasted. Ah well. It must be the Irish in you that makes you so knowledgeable. Top of the morning to you.

The Irish surname'******"is the Anglicized form of the Old Gaelic name O'Scolaidhe

Posted by: whups (3617)   Report abuse
your not knowledgable at all . like iv,e said in your case your wrong about everything.

Posted by: broady (14701)   Report abuse
Was I wrong about the Colliers?

Posted by: whups (3617)   Report abuse
your always wrong .i bet you was 1 of those who would,nt pay his £ 2 union dues in the builders trade.

Posted by: broady (14701)   Report abuse
Long time since I was in a Union. Negotiated my own salary. Made sure no typist got more bonus than me. Anyway I wish you all the best in life but your opinions are shite. To avoid my BP rising I will no longer see your posts.

Posted by: TerryW (1751) Report abuse
Mr Corbyn "is a man who earns almost £140,000 a year, lives in a house worth over £600,000 and will retire with a gold-plated pension of £1.6 million. If those numbers look quite large, it's because they are. But that's not the end of it. Since 1983, the country has seen six different Prime Ministers, but just one MP for the constituency of Islington North. Who might that be? Yeah, you guessed it. To sum up, a career politician who leads the Labour Party and makes in 10 weeks what Joe Bloggs down the road doesn't earn in a year is attempting to tell the country that, actually, he's one of us."

Of course he concerned about the poor and the NHS because he's a true socialist...with a lot of money.

Wake up and see this champagne socialist for what he is, a fake and a traitor with a pension of £1.6 million heading his way for doing what?

Posted by: Tommy Two Stroke (3626) Report abuse
It is like that Joe Gormley who led the miners, he lived in a posh house in Shevington, he did awreet out of it ....

Posted by: FAT MICK (170) Report abuse
Some people up here in posh Shevy do suspect a bit of fiddling went on over the sale of the old Robin Hill pit site, to his friend the ice cream man, who turned it into a hotel.
Later when the hotel opened he was quite often seen enjoying his dinner and a good wine by people who worked there.

Posted by: TerryW (1751) Report abuse
Yes Tommy like the great socialist and miners leader millionaire Arthur Scargill. Remember him, he thought the NUM should pay 30 grand a year for his London flat 12 years after he stepped down.

Posted by: Tommy Two Stroke (3626) Report abuse
Aye Mick and Terry ,,, and as the great Bill Maynard said as 'The Gaffer'

"tha cawn't beat the good old British backhander"



Posted by: whups (3617)   Report abuse
it comes with the job . nice to see 1stroke has put a pic of gaffer on here . it,s about right.

Posted by: stacker lee (309) Report abuse
Just read a great quote and wanted to share it!

When Oasis’s Liam Gallagher sang about how he wanted to “live forever” I don’t think he meant putting in some extra shifts at work in his 70s.

Beltin!!

Posted by: TerryW (1751) Report abuse
Liam Gallagher work? He sings (badly) hardly work is it, unless trying to be John Lennon and walking like an ape is what he thinks work is.

Posted by: stacker lee (309) Report abuse
Terry, Are we talking about Liam Gallagher or Boris Johnson?

Posted by: TerryW (1751) Report abuse
Deffo Liam, SL.

 
 
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